Tag Archives: Dunbar Delhi Stomacher

AOTB!: More Emeralds from Delhi Durbar 1911

emerald brooch with a rose carved in the faceemerald-and-diamond pendant brooch, 1911
 

Welcome to day three of Attack of the Brooches theme week. I figured “heck let’s make it a bit more specific by sticking with the emeralds brought up yesterday when We discussed the Durbar Delhi Stomacher & Parure Queen Mary wore when she and King George V were crowned Emperor and Empress of India in 1911. (The capital of India was also moved from Calcutta to Delhi on that December day.) As both of these brooches are dated 1911, both made of emerald and diamond, it seems highly likely that these stones were part of the Stomacher or Parure that cascaded down the Empress’ torso or perhaps they were part of the massive treasure offered as tribute, along with the Delhi Durbar Tiara and the Delhi Durbar Necklace.

And I guessed right! The stunning sparkler on the top left is known as the “Delhi Dunbar Brooch” and was presented to Queen Mary by the Maharani of Patiala in honor of the coronation. One can see the rose finely carved in the the hexagonal stone, the reverse side apparently sports a “foliage design”. 

To the right, we see a brooch originally used as separate and detachable parts of a stomacher made for the Duchess of Teck in the early 1890s, Queen Mary joined the two elements (joining two of the famed Cambridge Emeralds) into a brooch which she wore pinned below the Delhi Dunbar Stomacher. Although it should NOT be confused with the brooch pictured below, which is so TOTALLY distinct as it was made from two Cambridge Emeralds and was also incorporated into the Delhi Dunbar Stomacher.

Delhi Durbar Brooch/Stomacher

All sarcasm aside, the brooch on the left was regarded as the centerpiece of the stomacher that originally belonged to the Duchess of Teck, who eventually passed it along to her daughter, future Queen Mary. Both mother and daughter loved this triangular ornament. A stomacher is technically a decorated triangular panel that fills in the front opening of a woman’s gown or bodice or (in our case) it’s a piece of jewellery made to adorn said part of the lady’s bodice. As we all know, stomachers fell from fashion’s graces and the famous “verdant vee” was dismantled into at least three brooches, two of which we see here. I think one of the most interesting things I came across was a colorized recreation of the new Empress of India wearing her coronation regalia. Queen Mary, much like the original “Wizard of Oz” somebody decided that black-and-white couldn’t do you justice.

a colorized image of the new empress of india